Paleo Crossfit Bodybuilder – Example of Paleo Diet Crossfit Paleolithic Caveman Bodybuilding SeriousStrength SlowBurn Fitness Muscles -6

By | January 27, 2018

Some cool men fitness images:

Paleo Crossfit Bodybuilder – Example of Paleo Diet Crossfit Paleolithic Caveman Bodybuilding SeriousStrength SlowBurn Fitness Muscles -6
men fitness
Image by Paleo-Caveman-Omnivore-LowCarb-Meat-Diet-Info
Paleo Bodybuilder (Pics!) – Result of the Paleo Caveman Diet on Bodybuilding & Muscle.

The Paleo Diet says eat do like a Caveman. Cavemen lived in caves. So they were very pale. Sickly looking and eventual Albino-ism (pink). Cavemen didn’t lift rocks to build anything, otherwise we’d see it today. So cavemen had to run around instead, not only hunting but running away quickly from carnivores and wild animals chasing them so cavemen had not a lot of muscle. So they were instead spindly, pale, and lean, good for running away from things that scared it.

Paleolithic man that lived in the arctic was also very pale, living in icy regions. Ice Age man didn’t get much sun or vitamins and was also pale. Arctic Cavemen, like the Inuit don’t lay out on the beach, so paleos may look more sickly than a normal person, like the very pale Mark Sisson does. Another "Pale"-eo person example is Art De Vany. Arthur Devany is almost bleached.

The paleolithic diet in icy areas would result in a fat obese physique. Because the body would gain fat to insulate from the cold. The paleo diet has evolved to make humans fat if you don’t live in a tropical climate. The human body has evolved to build up loads of flab and gut flab eating paleo in order to protect from the ice age climate.

So the Paleolithic Diet has evolved to make mankind either pale and skinny when it’s warm, or pale and blubbery when its cold.

The Paleo Diet does’t taste too good. Cavemen picked at luke-warm bodies of discarded animals, so the paleolithic diet is now confirmed to include botfly maggots. You should add just a sprinkling of maggots to your dinner to get started, so you can get used to them, then later you can eat more.

Remember, cavemen didn’t have refrigerators, so if you live in a warm area, sorry, you can’t refrigerate your meat. Or any food for that matter. You have to put it outside and let it sit out there for a couple days until you eat it all.

To replenish electrolytes after a crossfit fitness workout, the paleo diet would include drinking un-treated water. You can’t drink bottled water if you’re paleo or crossfit. Cavemen didn’t have water filters. And no chlorine or sanitation. So you can’t drink out of any water fountains or out of the tap water in your house. You’ll need to drink out of a puddle if you get thirsty. Or stagnant pond-water will include lots of minerals and other things. Naturally, Loren Cordain of the Paleo Diet says to you that humans are ‘designed’ exactly for this, and thus you should not expect to get sick from it. Even if there is cryptosporidia or parasites or amoebas and feces in it. Paleo and crossfit says we are evolved for it.

If there’s any question, there’s always the Crossfit Puke bucket, for vomiting up your crossfit recipe meals.

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Army 10-Miler Shadow Run – Camp Humphreys – 2 OCT 2011
men fitness
Image by USAG-Humphreys
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Humphreys hosts Army 10-miler shadow run

By W. Wayne Marlow, U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS, SOUTH KOREA – Over 300 runners from across the Korean peninsula took part in the second annual Army 10-miler Shadow Run hosted here Oct. 2.

First Lieutenant Robert Anderson of the 532nd Military Intelligence Battalion won the nighttime race, designed to mirror the Army’s annual run in Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 3 minutes and 51 seconds. First Lieutenant Sarah Rainville took the women’s crown, finishing in 1:16:44.

Anderson said he initially thought only about doing his best and having a good run. But when some entrants passed him early in the race, his focused changed.

“I was going to try and take it easy … but then an adrenaline rush hit and I decided to pick it up,” he said.

Anderson maintained a steady pace, running the second half in just two more minutes than he did the first five miles. “I felt good the whole time,” he said. “I felt like I had some left in the tank. I started training for it last year, so I’ve been upping my mileage.”

The Camp Humphreys shadow run will be shown on a large screen during the Army 10-miler in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 9, and Anderson plans to be there to watch it and participate in his second 10-miler of the week. “This was prep for that one,” he said.

Former United States Army Garrison Humphreys Command Sgt. Maj. Jason Kim fired the opening gun at 9 p.m. locally to coincide with the actual time the run will start in Washington D.C. Led by Kim’s replacement, Command Sgt. Maj. Spencer Gray, the runners started under the Super Gym walkway, then snaked their way around the airfield twice, ending up back at Super Gym.

“It’s an absolutely great event,” Gray said. “Soldiers work hard, so when you can do something like this to build esprit de corps, it’s a positive thing. It’s an opportunity for everyone to have a good time.”

The crisp, cool October air helped keep the runners fresh, as did rehydration stations manned by volunteers along the route. The constant encouragement by fellow runners and cheering from the sidelines helped push the runners toward the finish.

“It’s not too cold. It’s nice running weather,” Gray said. “You can always wear something to keep you warm, and if it gets too hot, you can dress down.”

Anderson agreed that the race featured ideal conditions. “It’s great weather, no overheating,” he said. “It’s the best weather for running.”

Anderson said he has three brothers in the Army who are also all enthusiastic runners, and there was another family connection of note. Specialist Charles Rodgers IV flew from Hawaii to run the race with his father, Charles Rodgers III, who manages Splish and Splash Water Park on Humphreys. The two finished with identical times of 1:32:40.

Besides ideal weather and enthusiastic observers, the runners were treated to replicas of Washington, D.C., monuments built by Jeffrey Hubbard of the USAG Humphreys Family, Morale Welfare and Recreation office. The replicas, made of Styrofoam and braced by wood supports, included the Vietnam Memorial, the Pentagon, the Washington Monument, the Lincoln and Jefferson memorials, and the capitol. The project took about two weeks, according to Hubbard.

“It was to give everybody something extra to look at during the run and to do something different,” Hubbard said. “We figured looking at a poster would be kind of boring. We wanted to give them incentive to go and see the next one. They’ll be here next year. They’re built to last.”

Area III Sports Director Lonnie Herring credited volunteers with helping make the run a success.

“We had three drink tables on the trail and at the start and finish point,” he said. “We had BOSS bring in volunteers, folks standing on the road, and people handing out numbers and pace chips before the race.” The computerized chips, attached to the runners’ shoes, started and stopped when someone crossed the start and finish lines, giving everyone an accurate 10-mile time.

For all the logistics involved in having hundreds of people run 10 miles, Herring said most of the work was done beforehand.

“The pre-registration is the most time-consuming,” he said, also mentioning coordination with Military Police, road closures, medical considerations, and taxi and bus services being suspended. But all the work paid off in the end, Herring noted.

Prior to the run, entrants were addressed by USAG Humphreys Commander, Col. Joseph P. Moore.

“We’re here to have fun, and I hope your commanders told you that if you run this, there’s no P.T. tomorrow. Ten miles is no small task,” Moore said. “I’ve run this loop a lot at night. There’s plenty of light out there. The terrain is real friendly. There are no big hills, just a lot of open room to run.”

The top three finishers in the men’s 29 and under category were: Wbatt Reith (1:07:53); Samuel Smiths (1:09:09) and Daniel Bates (1:09:35). Following Anderson in the men’s 30-39 category were David Snow (1:12:41) and Nathan Stahl (1:18:02).

In the men’s 40-49 category, the top three finishers were Brett Bassett (1:14:49), Dan Burnett (1:17:06) and Felix Lassus (1:18:57). Leading the way in the men’s 50 and over category were Robert Nott (1:09:14), Mark Sullivan (1:09:57) and Kwon, Song-ki (1:19:23).

Following Rainville in the women’s 29 and under category were Kyle Wilson (1:22:20) and Liela Moser (1:26:01). In the women’s 30 and over category, top finishers were Sarah Stahl (1:20:45), Adam Leinen (1:27:52), and Jamila Moody (1:34:11). Taking the women’s over 40 crown was Kim, Hui-ok (1:37:06). In the women’s over 50 category, Barbara Garner (1:37:31) took first, followed by Susan Jentoft (1:43:23).

Photos courtesy U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, FMWR Marketing

Click here to view the garrison’s official Facebook fan page

Summertime lunch in Bryant Park, Aug 2009 – 56
men fitness
Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was published in a Sep 19, 2010 blog titled "Free Ping Pong at Bryant Park on Mondays." It was also published in an Apr 27, 2012 Fitness Websites blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page.

Moving into 2015, the photo was published in an Apr 30, 2015 blog titled "Lunchtime exercise increases worker enthusiasm."

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I had a lunchtime dentist appointment in midtown Manhattan the other day, and when it was over, I decided to walk a couple blocks over to Bryant Park, behind the New York Public Library. It was a sunny day, and I thought I might see some gorgeous babes sunbathing on the park lawn in their bikinis (even being an amateur photographer is a tough job, but someone’s gotta do it). If not, I thought perhaps I’d find some photogenic tourists or oddball New Yorkers that I could photograph.

As it turns out, almost all of the central lawn was being covered over with some kind of wooden platform — presumably for an upcoming concert performance of some kind — so nobody was sunbathing out on the grass. But since that area was unavailable, and since it was still the lunchtime period, the periphery around the central lawn was chock-a-block with people. There’s now a cafe immediately behind (i.e., to the west) of the library itself, and it was doing a land-office business. And all along the north and south sides of the park, as well as the broader western side, there were tables and chairs and benches where people could enjoy their lunch with whatever food or entertainment they had brought along.

I was already aware of the pentanque court on the western side of the park, and knew that I’d find one or two good pictures there. But I didn’t realize that the Parks Department had set up two ping-pong tables, as well as several tables for chess-players. In addition, there were a few card games underway, and there was also a section set aside for people who wanted to borrow local newspapers to read.

As for the people: I had to remind myself that because Bryant Park is smack in the middle of mid-town Manhattan (a block away from Times Square, filling the square block between 41st/42nd street, and 5th/6th Avenue), most of the people enjoying their lunch were office workers. So the men typically wore slacks and dress shirts, and a surprising number of them were also wearing suits and ties. The women wore dresses and skirts, and generally looked quite fashionable and presentable. Of course, there were also tourists and students and miscellaneous others; but overall, it was a much more "upscale" bunch of people than I’m accustomed to seeing in my own residential area on the Upper West Side.

I was surprised by how many people were sitting alone — eating alone, reading alone, listening to music alone, dozing alone, or just staring into space alone. You’ll see some of them in this album, though I didn’t want to over-emphasize their presence; equally important, many of the loners just weren’t all that interesting from a photogenic perspective. So you’ll also see lots of couples, some children, a couple of families, and occasionally larger groups of people who were eating and chatting and enjoying the warm summer day.

Three activities dominated the scene, all of which were fairly predictable, under the circumstances: eating, reading, and talking on cellphones. You would expect people to be eating at lunch-time, of course; and you wouldn’t be surprised at the notion of people reading a book as they sat behind the New York Public Library on a warm, sunny day. But the pervasiveness of the cellphones was quite astonishing … oh, yeah, there were a few laptops, too, but fewer than I might have imagined.

I’ve photographed Bryant Park several times over the past 40 years, going back to some photos of 1969 Vietnam War protest marches that you can see in this album. I was here in the summer of 2008 to take these photos; I came back in January 2009 to take these photos of the winter scene; and I returned again for these pictures in March 2009 and these these pictures in the late spring of 2009; all of these have been collected into a Flickr "collection" of albums that you can find here. But if you want to see what New York City’s midtown office workers are doing at lunch, take a look at what’s in this album.

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