Image from page 366 of “Indian wars and pioneers of Texas” (1890)

By | July 13, 2018

A few nice men fitness images I found:

Image from page 366 of “Indian wars and pioneers of Texas” (1890)
men fitness
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: indianwarspionee00brow
Title: Indian wars and pioneers of Texas
Year: 1890 (1890s)
Authors: Brown, John Henry, 1820-1895
Subjects: Indians of North America Frontier and pioneer life Indians of North America
Publisher: Austin : L.E. Daniel]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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for much of his success. His natural fitness for leadership and his famili-arity with public affairs, challenged the attentionof the people among whom he lived, and in 1880,unsought by him, he was elected to the Stale Senateof Texas, where he quickly went to the front as alegislator, and no man in that body had more in-fiuence. His uniform courtesy and lilierality wonhim friends fast, who have bided with him. Hewas one of the five men who drafted and formulateda bill creating the University of Texas, and so welland wisely did they work that that bill has neverbeen amended except in some minor details. Healso became conspicuous in his efforts to regulaterailway corporations. He advocated the Three-cents-a-mile Bill which became a law, and the pass-age of a law creating a Railroad Commission, whichhas in later years become so prominent in Texaspolitics. In 1882 he made the race for AttorneyGeneral and was defeated by only a small majority.In his speech of withdrawal from the convention

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R. M. WYNNK INDIAN WARS AND PIONEERS OF TEXAS. 263 Col. Wynne was most happy and captured theconvention and, though defeated in fact, it was con-ceded by all that he snatched victory out of defeat,and from that day his leadership has been unques-tioned. It was in 1886 that he was made perma-nent president of the State Convention, and added tohis already growino; influence by his ability andtact in controlling men under excitement incidentto a hot political contest. He has for some years been often spol?en of inconnection with the office of Governor of this State ;many of the best citizens and most influential menof the State would give liim an enthusiastic support.It is conceded by all that should he be elected tothat high position Texas would prosper and progressunder his broad and liberal administration, for noman is more loyal to his Slate and people and takesa deeper interest in their general welfare. It was in 1883 that Fort Worth gained Col. Wynneas one of its most valued citzen

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Image from page 158 of “The photographic history of the Civil War : thousands of scenes photographed 1861-65, with text by many special authorities” (1911)
men fitness
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Identifier: photographichist06mill
Title: The photographic history of the Civil War : thousands of scenes photographed 1861-65, with text by many special authorities
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Miller, Francis Trevelyan, 1877-1959 Lanier, Robert S. (Robert Sampson), 1880-
Subjects: United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865 Pictorial works United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865
Publisher: New York : Review of Reviews Co.
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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orts, and thiswith a great reduction of crew. It admits of the use of much heavierguns. It does not necessarily involve a breadth of beam antagonistic tovelocity. It affords a better protection to guns and men, and withal,it secures the fighting of guns longer in a sea-way. Fiuther on the admiral speaks of the other departure fromold types and traditions. He says: The Sew Ironsides, I regard as a much more efficient type of iron-clad than the monitors just discussed, because of her possessing decidedadvantages over them in the particulars of fitness for general purposes,seaworthiness, relative strength of bottom, or absolute capacity toendure vibration thereat, security against an antagonistic vessel. . . .Hatl she been planned for turrets, instead of to use guns at broadsideports, she would have been, I think, still more formidable; nor is sheunexceptionable in other respects, and among them speed and tiuiiing-qualities. [152] (N * ^B m CHAPTERVI THE MOST FAMOUS AMERICAN NAVAL BATTLE

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COPTHIGmT, 911, PATRIOT PUB. CO. THE MONITORS SECOND COMMANDERA PHOTOGRAPH FOUR MONTHS AFTER THE MOST FAMOUS FIGHT LIEUTENANT W. N. JEFFERS, WHO SUCCEEDED THE GALLANT AND WOUNDED WORDENAFTER THE CONTEST, ATsD COMMANDED THE IRONCL.D THROUGH MO.ST OF HER CAREER

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Image from page 138 of “Andersonville : a story of Rebel military prisons, fifteen months a guest of the so-called southern confederacy : a private soldier’s experience in Richmond, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Florence” (1879)
men fitness
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Identifier: andersonvilles00mcel
Title: Andersonville : a story of Rebel military prisons, fifteen months a guest of the so-called southern confederacy : a private soldier’s experience in Richmond, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Florence
Year: 1879 (1870s)
Authors: McElroy, John, 1846-1929
Subjects: Andersonville Prison United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865
Publisher: Toledo : D. R. Locke
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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hape of stupid, open-eyed, open-mouthedwonder, something akin to the look on the face of the rusticlout, gazing for the first time upon a locomotive or a steamthreshing machine. But if chance threw one of them near us whenbe thought himself unobserved by the Rebels, the blank, vacantface lighted up with an entirely different expression. He was nolonger the credulous yokel who believed the Yankees were onlyslightly modified devils, ready at any instant to return to theiroriginal horn-and-tail condition and snatch him away to thebluest kind of perdition; he knew, apparently quite as well ashis master, that they were in some way his friends and allies,and he lost no opportunity in communicating his appreciationof that fact, and of offering his services in any possible way.And these offers were sincere. It is the testimony of every A STOKY OF KEBEL MILITARY PRISONS. 135 Union prisoner in the South that he was never betrayed by ordisappointed in a field negro, but could always approach any

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A FIELD HAND. one of them with perfect confidence in his extending all the aidin his power, whether as a guide to escape, as sentinel to signaldanger, or a purveyor of food. These services were frequentlyattended with the greatest personal risk, but they were nonethe less readily undertaken. This applies only to the field-hands; the house servants were treacherous and wholly un-reliable. Yery many of our men who managed to get awayfrom the prisons were recaptured through their betrayal byhouse servants, but none were retaken where a field hand couldprevent it. We were much interested in watching the negro workThey wove in a great deal of their peculiar, wild, mournfulmusic, whenever the character of the labor permitted. Theyseemed to sing the music for the musics sake alone, and wereas heedless of the fitness of the accompanying words, as thecomposer of a modern opera is of his libretto. One middle-aged man, with a powerful, mellow baritone, like the round,ful] notes of a French horn,

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